The Best of WordPress.com in April

You’re off to a strong creative start in 2017! Here are a few recent updates and stories from the WordPress.com community in April that we wanted to share with you.

What’s new

This Year’s WordPress Default Theme, Twenty Seventeen, Is Now Available

wptwentyseventeentheme

“Great looking theme!” – Jason Thornberry

Independent Publisher 2 Is Here

flat-device-mock

The Independent Publisher theme has long been beloved for its simplicity and legibility, and we’re happy to announce that it has been improved, ever so slightly. Read our interview with the designers, Caroline Moore and Kjell Reigstad.

Check Out the New Look, Products, and Features of the WordPress Swag Store

monstro_wordpress_swag-25

For a chance to be featured on the website, post WordPress swag pics to Twitter and Instagram using #WPSWAG. Use code WPSWAG for 20% off all items. (Offer ends May 12.)

Longreads Just Turned 8 Years Old. Here’s What the Next Eight Years Look Like

celebrating-8-years

Longreads is rapidly becoming the best place on the internet for personal essays, and there are ambitious plans to do even more. Read more on our plans, and contribute to the Longreads story fund — WordPress.com will even match your contributions.


Designing for [X]: inclusion

AA Quote 01 alt

Better conceptualizing, designing, building, and improving how to meet the needs of underserved users is a core part of how we work at WordPress.com, and that was the focus of April’s Design and Exclusion (#DesignX) conference (check out the complete video and transcript at x.design.blog). 

hack20detroit20day20220tours-9343-01201

How can we help entrepreneurs working in cities around the world? That’s the challenge Hajj Flemings explored in an April essay for Design.blog. He shares some of the insights which came out of the 100 Project Hackathon — a project tasked to build nine small business sites in a 48-hour period in Detroit. 

Perspectives: ‘But Wait, Is Your Last Name Filipino?’ (Samantha Hankins)


In your toolbox: inspiration + insights

10,000 Kilometers: Quintin Lake on Walking and Photographing Britain’s Coastline

Flock of Sheep, Gammon Head, Devon.

Two Aprils ago, Quintin Lake set off from St. Paul’s Cathedral in London. The journey? To walk 10,000 kilometers around the coast of Britain. We caught Quintin just before he embarked on a 15-day adventure around the edge of Snowdonia, North Wales. Read about Quintin’s epic walk along the sea.

Quotables: “If you really love writing, it’s like eating. You can’t live without doing it.” – The writing life of Harvard historian and New Yorker staff writer Jill Lepore (Harvard Gazette).

Case Study: How one photographer is blogging a 10,000 kilometer journey around the coast of Britain.

Try it out: Importing Google Docs → WordPress.com.


Now following

“WordPress was the best… I’m very happy to be back.” — welcome back, Leo Laporte!

Check out Amazon CTO Werner Vogels’s new site, Werner.blog.

Hang out with us on Instagram and tag your ‘grams with #DiscoverWP.


That’s all for now!

What did you love about your own work in April? Comment with a link to a post you’re proud of, or something new you learned about designing your site. Feeling motivated? Download the WordPress app on iOS and Android

Filed under: Design, Discover, Themes, WordPress.com
Source: 38

Independent Publisher 2 Is Here

The popular Independent Publisher design is a WordPress theme that has long been beloved for its simplicity and legibility. So we are happy to announce that it has been improved, ever so slightly, with the design talents of Caroline Moore and Kjell Reigstad.

Introducing Independent Publisher 2:

Independent Publisher was first designed, developed, and released four years ago by Raam Dev in his introductory post to the Independent Publisher Project:

“I’ve been using WordPress for the past 8 years and in that time my site has always had a modified version of someone else’s theme. I always found it easier to start with a theme created by someone else and simply modifying it until I had it the way I wanted.” —Raam Dev, 2013

I recently caught up with Raam to learn about the origins of Independent Publisher.

JM: How did Independent Publisher come to be?

RD: I had that design swimming around in my head for years—it’s the culmination 7 years of hacking away at a constantly-evolving WordPress theme for my personal site, tweaking and updating it every few months to apply my latest understanding of what ‘good design’ meant. Over the years I had gotten so many requests from people who wanted to use the theme that I was using, but the current theme was always so hacked-together that I wasn’t able to easily share it. Finally in 2013 I decided to put everything that I’d learned into building a theme that could be shared and that’s where the Independent Publisher theme was born. I’ve been amazed by how many people use it—it’s such a weird feeling to visit the site of a stranger on the Internet only to discover they’re using the theme that I helped build!

JM: Are you a designer or a developer? I mean, your last name is … “Dev.”

RD: I’m definitely a bit of both. I love building things but I also love thinking about the ultimate purpose of what gets built, the ‘why’ behind the ‘what’.

About my last name, it hadn’t even occurred to me how appropriate my last name was for the type of work that I do until my developer friends started asking if it was really my last name.

JM: What advice do you give for budding designer/devs like yourself when starting off in creating a theme?

RD: Start with the end in mind. When I built the Independent Publisher theme, I kept revisiting the same set of questions at every step along the way: What’s the ultimate purpose of this theme? What is it trying to do? What is its ultimate objective?

JM: How have mobile devices changed how we consume content these days?

RD: If there was ever a good example of the importance of considering the design impact of what we build, mobile would be it. With mobile devices, users don’t get to choose the size of their web browser. They have little choice about the constraints imposed on them by the devices in their hands. That means it’s up to us developers and designers to ensure that content can be consumed as easily as possible on mobile.


In case you are wondering, “What is a theme?” I can tell you that according to Automattic founder and CEO Matt Mullenweg, “themes” began from WordPress version 1.5 way back in 2005. A theme is an encapsulation of code and design knowledge — it lets you customize the look and feel of a WordPress site to be exactly the way that you want. If you are a designer that is new to themes, I suggest that you read this short essay by Mel Choyce on “3 Reasons Why Every Designer Should Create A WordPress Theme.”

Because Independent Publisher came out in 2013, it deserved a tiny set of enhancements. We thought the best two people to lead the design challenge needed to be our theming veteran Caroline Moore and our typography expert Kjell Reigstad.

JM: What makes a good theme?

CM: A rock-solid code foundation like Components and a design that feels like home. My favorites are bold, colorful themes with lots of personality; Scratchpad by my colleague Laurel Fulford comes to mind.

JM: What makes for good typography?

KR: Good typography doesn’t get in the way. It’s balanced, legible, and subtle.

JM: Are there any aspects of Independent Publisher that caught your attention when it was first released on WP.com?

CM: Using a Gravatar as a site logo wasn’t common around the time Independent Publisher was released, so that stood out to me as a neat way to make the theme more personalized right out of the box.

JM: What makes one paragraph more legible than the other?

KR: There are a number of variables that affect the readability of paragraphs. Aside from the more obvious ones like typeface and font size, I find leading and column width to be the most important.

Leading (also known as “line-spacing”) is the space between lines of text. If the space is too wide, your eyes have to work hard to jump from one line of text to the next. If it’s too narrow, your eyes have to work hard at differentiating each line as you’re reading. Leading adjustments can be very subtle, but the right balance makes a big impact.

Column width is a little more self-explanatory. If a paragraph of text is too wide, your eyes will have to take a large horizontal jump each time you progress onto a new line. If the paragraph is too narrow, your eyes will have to make the jump more often. Both of these cases can cause eye fatigue. An ideal column width is somewhere in the middle.

JM: What about this Independent Publisher refresh benefits the reader?

KR: In my opinion, the best update is the switch to using system fonts by default. More often than not nowadays, websites load in custom font files to display all their text. This is great visually, but it does lead to slightly longer page load times.

System fonts are are included with your device by default. These are pretty standard fonts, and tend to be very widely available. You’ve probably heard of many of them: Helvetica, Times, and Georgia for instance. Switching to use these fonts means we don’t have to load in additional font files every time your site loads. This saves time, and is especially handy when visitors are on a slow or unstable mobile connection.

Best of all, the system fonts we used are beautiful! Headlines are set in your computer’s default sans serif font Apple’s San Francisco font, and Android’s Roboto for example, and body text is set in Georgia by the beloved Matthew Carter.

JM: Where do you see the world of themes heading, Caroline?

CM: I want to see themes condensed into a single CSS file, applied over different components that you can mix and match to build any kind of site you can imagine.

JM: If I’m a beginner to design and want to learn more about typography, how do I start, Kjell?

KR: This is a quick, 6-minute video that I made last year to share the joy of typography:

JM: Thank you Raam, Caroline, and Kjell!


So there you have it — enjoy the new power of Independent Publisher 2, and set yourself free to write with enhanced legibility, special tweaks for mobile, and an overall faster experience for your readers.

Read more about Raam Dev, Caroline Moore, and Kjell Reigstad on their respective websites:

Raam Dev Caroline Moore Kjell Reigstad

Filed under: Better Blogging, Design, Themes
Source: 38

New Theme: Twenty Seventeen

We’re excited to announce that this year’s WordPress default theme, Twenty Seventeen, is now available on WordPress.com.

Designed by Mel ChoyceTwenty Seventeen is a business-oriented theme that allows you to create a stunning front-page layout with multiple sections. The theme can be topped with a large custom header image or atmospheric video of your choosing.

Twenty Seventeen can be customized further by adding a logo, custom color or fonts, or widgets.

We paid special attention to making sure the theme’s typography works well with as many languages as possible. Font adjustments for the following alphabets to improve readability:

  • Arabic
  • Chinese
  • Cyrillic
  • Devanagari
  • Greek
  • Gujarati
  • Hebrew
  • Japanese
  • Korean
  • Thai

Twenty Seventeen has also been designed to look good on a variety of screen sizes.

Learn more about WordPress’s latest default theme here, or check out the demo site!

Filed under: Themes
Source: 38

Videos Tutoriales Subtitulados

¡Lo prometido es deuda!

Continuando con brindarles soporte en Español, ahora también encontrarán que muchos de los videos tutoriales tienen subtítulos en nuestro idioma.
 

Aquí la lista completa de los videos que por ahora, cuentan con subtítulos:

https://es.support.wordpress.com/video-tutoriales/

Recuerden darle clic a Configuración -> Subtitulos -> Español, para que no se pierdan los detalles de cada tutorial.

¡Y a seguir creando con WordPress.com!


Source: 15

A New WordPress App Update, Designed for the iPad

Over the past few months we’ve been working to dramatically improve users’ experience on iPad — and we’re proud to share those with you now, in our WordPress app for iOS, available in the iTunes Store.

IMG_1394.jpg

The apps were originally designed with only iPhones in mind, so we wanted to make better use of the space available on the iPad and especially iPad Pro, to maximize your productivity in the app. These changes shipped incrementally, with the very final ones being included in the 7.1 release that went out last week.

We’ve improved the My Sites management to make it easier to handle multiple sites on iPad. Now you can see the posts from that blog alongside the list of blogs, and site management is now all on one screen – no more back and forth!

null

null

null

Managing profiles follows the same pattern.

null

Notifications has been overhauled, too.

nullnull

We’re really excited about these improvements and hope iPad users of WordPress will be, too! We look forward to continuing to improve your WordPress experience, no matter what device you use.

Get the app on iTunes.

Filed under: Admin Bar
Source: 38

Unlimited Premium Themes Now Included in the Premium Plan

Finding just the right look for your site can be a fun task. If you’re on the Premium plan, it’s about to get a lot more fun: the Premium plan now includes unlimited access to all our premium themes.

Gema screenshot
Bailey screenshot
Aperitive screenshot
Carmack screenshot
Halves screenshot
Sonsa screenshot
Spatial screenshot

With over 200 premium themes on WordPress.com — and new themes added regularly — that’s more than $16,000 worth of premium themes. We bring the best premium theme designs to WordPress.com, meaning you get new, unique themes to choose from more often. From niche- and industry-specific themes like Aperitive and Marquee to beautiful blogging themes like Radiate to themes with colorful, stylish touches like Gema or Jason, you have more chances than ever of finding your perfect style.

This new addition to the Premium plan gives more of you the opportunity to try our great premium themes and make your sites shine!

Visit the Plans page to learn more about what WordPress.com Premium has to offer, or browse all our premium themes to get excited about the possibilities. Ready to upgrade your site? Head to My Sites → Plan.

Filed under: Features, Themes
Source: 38

Información sobre WordPress.com for Google Docs: Un paso más hacia la edición colaborativa

Estamos encantados de presentarte WordPress.com for Google Docs, un nuevo complemento que te permite escribir y editar documentos y colaborar con otras personas en Documentos de Google. Luego, puedes guardarlos como entradas de blog en cualquier sitio de WordPress.com o en uno de WordPress autohospedado que esté conectado a Jetpack. También se guardarán las imágenes y el formato que tengas. Ya no tendrás que preocuparte más de copiar y pegar.

null

Para empezar, ve directo a la página de Google Web Store y haz clic en el complemento para instalarlo.

Solo tendrás que conceder permiso a nuestro plugin para que pueda publicar entradas en tu nombre. Una vez concedido, ya podrás empezar a escribir.

Cuando quieras guardar un borrador de Documentos de Google como entrada de blog, accede al menú de complementos y abre WordPress.com for Google Docs. Verás una barra lateral donde podrás añadir los sitios de WordPress.com o los conectados a Jetpack.

Haz clic en el botón Guardar borrador y verás un enlace de vista previa para que puedas comprobar el aspecto de tu sitio. Edita la entrada en WordPress.com para darle un toque diferente y, cuando estés a punto, ¡Ya puedes publicarla!

Tienes el código fuente en GitHub si quieres saber con más detalle cómo funciona. Y, ¡claro! como no podía ser de otra manera, hemos escrito esta entrada en Documentos de Google y la hemos publicado con el complemento de WordPress.com para Documentos de Google.


Source: 15

Field Notes: CMS Africa Summit

Automatticians, the people who build WordPress.com, participate in events and projects around the world every day. Periodically, they report back on the exciting things they do in the community.

This year’s CMS Africa Summit was my third attendance at this amazing conference. My colleagues Marjorie, Sarah, Hannah, and Luminus joined me for the event and in doing so we sent Automatticians from three different continents.

Democratizing eCommerce

For several years now, Automattic has been the title sponsor for CMS Africa Summit. After conferences in Kenya (2015) and Uganda (2016), the 2017 edition took place in Abuja, Nigeria. The team behind the summit consists of industry leaders from all three of those countries. Together they also represent some of the world’s most popular open source content management systems (CMSs): Joomla, Drupal, and (of course) WordPress.

As one of the tech hubs in Sub-Saharan Africa, Nigeria is leading tech innovation on the continent. The conference by consequence focused on the practical use of CMSs, more so than in previous years: how they can boost local businesses and grow the economy.

For that reason, the attendees were very interested in eCommerce as a way to take their startups online. We introduced them to WooCommerce as an open source tool for economic empowerment, and shared practical and localized guidelines. Many of the entrepreneurs we encountered expressed their love for open source software because it doesn’t require them to invest their precious startup budget in software.

Presence

The slides and summaries of our talks can be found on our respective websites. Here’s a selection of some of the other talks we loved. Prosper Otemuyiwa, our favorite keynote speaker, focused on how to build a product the open source way. Nigerian CMS organizer Adedayo Adeniyi talked about the need for online growth in Nigeria and putting checks and balances in place for high-quality local web development. Software developer Idris Abdul Azeez highlighted the importance of documenting not only software configuration but also its development process, since writing readable code is a necessary cornerstone for the open source community and facilitates members’ contributions.

We were moved when lead organizer Oduor Jagero shared his excitement that Automattic had sent a team of staff to attend, present workshops, and connect in person with the Nigerian tech and open source community. Beyond the financial support, taking the time to teach and to listen to the local stories is especially appreciated. If you’re ready to listen too, here’s a great place to start: Jagero asked his friends on Facebook to share their blog posts about love. Three of the best stories will be awarded a basket of WordPress goodies. Here are the best ones he selected: Lovine Mboya, Akello, and Nepenthe.

CMS Africa Summit 2017 was amazing, just as in previous years. As outsiders, the local community welcomed us with open arms. The eagerness to learn, grow, and be successful was inspiring. On to the next one!

Below are some pictures taken by organizer David Aswani.






























Filed under: Automattic, Events
Source: 38

New in Reader: Combined Cards

If you’ve ever followed a frequently updating site in Reader, you may have noticed a problem. When one of your followed sites goes on a posting streak, it can easily overwhelm your stream, causing you to miss posts from less frequent sites.

Today we launched a new feature to alleviate this problem: Combined Cards. Now, when a site you follow gets prolific, we’ll combine those posts into a single card — provided the posts are all from the same day and uninterrupted by posts from other sites.

Here’s a recent example from Time Magazine. (Did you know you can follow Time in Reader? You can!) Before on the left, after on the right.

cc-example

For Writers: If you post once a day, your posts will never be combined in Reader. If you post more than once a day, it’s possible your posts will be combined for some readers and not others — it depends on how many other sites they follow and when they post. Posts will only be combined if they’re uninterrupted by other posts.

For Readers: Your Followed Sites stream still shows all the posts from the sites you follow, in exactly the same order. The only thing that’s changed is that if a site posts a string of new posts, we’ll combine them into one card so they take up less vertical space.

We hope this change makes Reader more pleasant to use, and helps you feel comfortable following more frequently updating sites. If you’d like some suggestions, here are some great high frequency sites we recommend: Fortune, People, Laughing SquidUproxxThe Sports DailyHeavy, TechCrunchBlack America Web, and BGR. Remember to click the “Follow” link at the top of the page to add it to your Reader.

WordPress.com members can visit Reader in the usual spot. Not a member yet? Join us. And thanks, as always, for being part of the WordPress.com community.

Filed under: Reading
Source: 38

Save Your Favorite Images and Media on WordPress.com, Anytime

We’ve added a new media section to your WordPress.com dashboard, allowing you to bulk upload, edit, and tweak your media files. Let’s look at the changes:

Upload Media in Bulk

Add new items in bulk by going to MediaAdd New to activate the file picker. You can also drag and drop items right onto the page.

Edit Media

Now you can edit media files as you add them to your post or directly from the media section. To modify media information like the title or caption, select the items you would like to edit, then click Edit.

In the details view, you can update the title, caption, and description. Any changes made in these fields will be saved automatically for you.

Edit Photos

If you have a photo that needs to be cropped or rotated you can now update this here, too! From the media detail view select Edit Image.

In the Image Editor (see this guide for full instructions), you can crop, rotate, and flip images directly on WordPress.com.

If you’re happy with the changes you’ve made, select Done.

Search

Finding a previously uploaded media item is easier, too. Go to the filter tabs to sort media by file type, or select the magnifying glass to open the search field and search for images by title. In the details view, you can copy the URL link for use in a new post or page.

We hope you enjoy these updates to your Media Library!

Filed under: Admin Bar
Source: 38